5 Most Popular Types of Spinach to Grow in Your Garden

Most popular types of spinach to grow – Some spinach cultivars, regardless of kind, perform well during specific seasons. Bolting-prone cultivars perform best when grown and harvested in cold seasons, whereas bolt-resistant kinds do well in warmer months as well. There are five kinds of genuine spinach that are commonly grown, as well as a few imposters that use the name.

Smooth-Leaf Types

Smooth Leafed Types of spinach

Smooth-leaf spinach, also known as flat-leaf spinach, accounts for the majority of commercial output destined for grocery stores and canned or processed meals. Smooth-leaf varieties grow low to the ground, which may result in muddy leaves, but the wide, smooth leaves make cleaning and processing easier. Smooth-leaf spinach does not retain dirt, sand, or stray insects since it lacks the crinkles seen in other spinach varieties. Among the finest cultivars are:

Some spinach cultivars, regardless of kind, perform well during specific seasons. There are five kinds of genuine spinach** that are commonly grown, as well as a few imposters that use the name.

  • Spinacia oleracea ‘Corvair’ spinach has extremely dark green, smooth, oval leaves. Slow to grow and bolt, it performs best when planted in the spring for summer harvests.
  • Spinacia oleracea ‘Gazelle’ spinach has smooth, dark green leaves. It’s fast growing and quick to bolt, making it ideal for late summer and autumn plantings, as well as harvests from fall to spring, where growing conditions allow.

Savoy Types

Savoy Types of spinach

The puckered, deep green leaves of low-growing savoy varieties may get dirty and sandy. Though more difficult to clean, they are popular at farmers’ markets due to their beautiful leaf texture. Savoy leaves, which are often cold-tolerant, are ideal for crisp salads. Among the most popular types are:

  • Spinacia oleracea ‘Corvair’ spinach has extremely dark green, smooth, oval leaves.
    Slow to grow and bolt, it performs best when planted in the spring for summer harvests. * Spinacia oleracea ‘Gazelle’ spinach has smooth, dark green leaves.
  • Spinacia oleracea ‘Kookabura’ spinach has dark and deeply crinkled, rounder leaves and is a rapid grower with moderate bolting tendencies. It grows well in both the spring and autumn, producing harvests in early summer and again in the fall to early winter.
  • Spinacia oleracea ‘Harmony’ spinach (Spinacia oleracea ‘Harmony’) is a bolt-resistant early-season cultivar. The highly puckered, dark greens have a strong taste.
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Semi-Savoys Types

Semi-Savoys Types of spinach

The finest of both worlds is combined in semi-savoy spinach. They grow taller and more erect, resulting in less dirt and filth, but they retain beautiful, slightly crinkled leaves. These types of spinach are often suggested for novices and household gardeners since they are resistant to bolting and disease. Among the many types are:

  • Spinacia oleracea ‘Kookabura’ spinach has dark and deeply crinkled, rounder leaves and is a rapid grower with moderate bolting tendencies.

It grows well in both the spring and autumn, producing harvests in early summer and again in the fall to early winter. Spinacia oleracea ‘Harmony’ spinach (Spinacia oleracea ‘Harmony’ is a bolt-resistant, early-season cultivar.

  • Spinacia oleracea ‘Emperor’ spinach (Spinacia oleracea ‘Emperor’) with dark green leaves and modest growth and bolting speed. It thrives in late-summer and autumn plantings, with harvests continuing into March where circumstances allow. * Spinacia oleracea ‘Reflect’ spinach has medium green leaves with a little pucker. Slow to bolt, this medium-rate growth thrives when planted in cold spring, summer, and autumn.

Red Veins Types

Red Veins Types of spinach

These spinach cultivars resemble typical beet (Beta vulgaris) greens in appearance, with deep red stems and veins. They provide a splash of color to salads while retaining the traditional spinach flavor. Among the many colorful variations are:

  • Spinacia oleracea ‘Red Kitten’ spinach has smooth, medium green leaves with dark, burgundy-red, erect stems and veins. This cultivar is ideal for cold autumn planting since it grows quickly and bolts quickly. Harvesting will continue from late winter until early April.
  • Spinacia oleracea ‘Bordeaux’ spinach (Spinacia oleracea ‘Bordeaux’) produces dark green, red-veined leaves. It grows quickly and bolts quickly, but it has a wonderful, sweet taste. Plant it twice a year, once in the spring and once in the autumn.
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Arrowheads Types

Arrowheads Types of Spinach

This types of spinach, also known as Asian leaf or Oriental leaf, has a characteristic arrowhead leaf shape, thick leaves, and a moderate taste. These kinds are notoriously sluggish to flee as a group. Among the many types are:

  • ‘Flamingo’ spinach (Spinacia oleracea ‘Flamingo’) has dark, green arrowhead leaves and grows quickly but does not bolt quickly. Plant throughout the spring, summer, and autumn, and enjoy harvests from late spring to early spring the following year.
  • Spinacia oleracea ‘Summer Delight’ spinach (Spinacia oleracea ‘Summer Delight’) is heat-tolerant and slow to bolt. It has broad, dark green foliage that are ideal for growing in the spring and summer. It’s an excellent option for hot conditions.

This spinach variety, also known as Asian leaf or Oriental leaf, has a characteristic arrowhead leaf shape, thick leaves, and a moderate taste.

Plant throughout the spring, summer, and autumn for harvests from late spring to early spring the next year. Spinacia oleracea ‘Summer Delight’ spinach (Spinacia oleracea ‘Summer Delight’) is heat-tolerant and slow to bolt.

Hot-Season Substitutes

Some popular greens have the same common name as genuine spinach but no botanical relationship. Sow these heat-loving greens after the latest frost date in your area. During the summer heat, these heat-tolerant greens are excellent replacements for real spinach. Here are several examples:

  • Tetragonia tetragonioides (New Zealand spinach) is a warm-season green that tolerates hot summers and provides typical spinach flavor to the table.
  • Red Malabar spinach (Basella rubra), commonly known as Ceylon spinach, is a vining, heat-tolerant green that looks stunning when grown on a trellis or arbor. The red-stemmed and red-veined beauty resembles spinach and chard in appearance and flavor (Beta vulgaris var. cicla).
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What Are the Best Spinach Varieties to Grow in Planters?

Spinach Varieties to grow

Based on the texture of the leaves, there are three main types of spinach: savoy, semi-savoy, and smooth. Semi-savoy spinach has higher, less crinkled leaves and cultivars that are resistant to both bolting and illness. The leaves of smooth spinach are flat. Areas with cold summers may typically have a longer growth season for spinach. Seedlings must survive the harsh winter temperatures if sown in the autumn.

Put “Bloomsdale” into one planter to get a head start on your spinach harvest. It can withstand temperatures as low as 15 or 20 degrees Fahrenheit. Planters are simple to cover for cold protection below that temperature range. Choose “Regiment” or “Spinner” savoy varieties for their resistance to blue mold and bolting to prolong savoy plantings further in the season.

“Tyee” is a cultivar that may be progressively planted in planters for a staggered year-round harvest in moderate winter regions. It is resistant to downy mildew strains 1 and 3 and has excellent bolt resistance. ” Emu” is the smoothest and slowest bolting type.

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